Song of the Day #1805

Song of the Day: The Breeze and I, music by Cuban composer Ernesto Lecuono (originally entitled “Andalucia” [YouTube link]), Spanish lyrics by Emilio de Torro, English lyrics by Al Stillman, was a huge hit in 1940 for the Jimmy Dorsey Band, featuring vocalist Bob Eberly [YouTube link]. It was also recorded by vocalist Dinah Shore with Xavier Cugat, Caterina Valente with the Werner Muller Orchestra, Vic Damone, and Bing Crosby (in a medley with “Malaguena”) [YouTube links], as well as by alto saxophonist Art Pepper. My all-time favorite instrumental rendition comes from the irrepressible jazz guitarist Wes Montgomery [YouTube link].

The Dialectics of Liberty: BLOW OUT SALE!!!

The Dialectics of Liberty: Exploring the Context of Human Freedom, co-edited by Roger E. Bissell, Chris Matthew Sciabarra, and Edward W. Younkins, was published in 2019 by Lexington Books as a quality softcover for the price of $42.99. You can’t get it for a lower price anywhere. Even “used” copies go for $36 or more!

Until Now!

The quality softcover is being offered by our benefactor at the amazing low price of $5.00 per book (a 6-book maximum), while supplies last, + $5.00 shipping and handling regardless of how many books you order! It is not available at this price for sales outside of the United States.

I will inscribe each copy personally on behalf of the volume’s co-editors and contributors. Go to DOL Discount now and just click on the “Number of Books” you want and let Paypal do the rest.

Some wonderful reviews of the book are forthcoming, and some have already been published. As Kathleen Touchstone tells us in The Independent Review:

The Dialectics of Liberty . . . includes eighteen essays written by nineteen authors. The essays draw from a variety of disciplines which include aesthetics, economics, psychology, history, and philosophy. It is the first collection of works on this subject by scholars with this range of disciplinary diversity. Dialectics of Liberty represents an important contribution in advancing dialectical libertarianism. … There is something to interest virtually anyone.”

The book has received high marks from such scholars as Stephen Cox, Lester Hunt, and Mario Rizzo:

The Dialectics of Liberty is a remarkably wide-ranging study of libertarian ideas, conducted by writers of great authority but of different views and approaches. Mature yet lively, it is full of surprises. If you want to know the state of libertarian thought right now, you will need to read this book.”
— Stephen Cox, University of California, San Diego

“This book of original essays by thinkers from a very wide array of disciplines opens the fascinating possibility of recasting the libertarian and classical liberal points of view in terms of ‘dialectical libertarianism.’ This way of looking at the matter promises to lay to rest once and for all the charge that these points of view are atomistic and ahistorical. I hope it inspires further research along these lines.”
— Lester H. Hunt, University of Wisconsin-Madison

“This stimulating collection maps out exciting new directions in the philosophy of liberty. The essays are authored by some of the best minds in scholarly libertarian thought today. Whether you are a libertarian or not, you will find many important—and challenging—ideas developed here. An important and lively book.”
— Mario Rizzo, New York University

Get your discounted copy today!

Phucumol: Remedy for the Political Season!

I don’t do TikTok or much of any other social media (except blogging, Facebook, uh, okay, fuhgedaboudit!)… but this one went viral last month, and given that we’re now moving Top Speed into the political season, this has become my general attitude. If folks don’t care for language of this sort, well, You Need to Calm Down and Take Phucumol.


Song of the Day #1804

Song of the Day: Never Let Me Go, words and music by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston, was first heard in the 1956 Michael Curtiz-directed crime drama, “The Scarlet Hour” brought to life in the film by the great Nat King Cole and in a longer studio recording as well [YouTube links]. Jazz pianist Bill Evans recorded this song for his album, “Alone,” for which he received his third of seven Grammy Awards (out of 31 total nominations in his career). The legendary musician was born on this date in 1929. Check out Bill’s 14+ minute solo piano performance of this lovely composition [YouTube link].

Song of the Day #1803

Song of the Day: C.E.D., composed by jazz guitarist Joe Pass and jazz pianist Arnold Ross, is featured on Pass’s debut album—and what a debut it was—“Sounds of Synanon,” recorded with patients of the Synanon Drug Center, where a young Pass was being treated for heroin addiction. Influenced by jazz guitar pioneers Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian, Pass would go on to become one of the greatest jazz guitarists in the history of the genre. (In fact, his tribute album, “For Django” [YouTube album link] remains a staple in the jazz guitar pantheon [YouTube link to a Django tribute from jazz guitarist Johnny Smith]. Check out the album version of this opening track to the Synanon album and a live TV version [YouTube links], where you can witness the birth of that unique fiery, rhythmic, melodic, virtuosic technique that Pass would come to master.

Majority Rules NY Debuts New Site

I had previously sung the praises of the podcasts of Majority Rules NY, which is hosted by my friend and neighbor Pasquale Cascone and his pal Shaun Lembo.

Check out their new website and their newest episode on YouTube. I’m waiting for the T-shirt to come out! It’s just a couple of regular neighborhood guys from Brooklyn keeping it real in an era of so much BS. Cheers, guys!

Song of the Day #1802

Song of the Day: Blue Trombone [YouTube link], composed by trombonist Rex Peer, is delivered with lyrical, melodic flair by my long-time friend—author, editor, and trombonist Roger Bissell—on his album “Reflective Trombone.” Just another reason to love and celebrate Roger and his gifts.

Notablog and Home Page: Born Again!

It gives me great pleasure to announce that Notablog, which began on 26 July 2002, has been “born again,” with its own domain name: https://notablog.net.

And it gives me just as much pleasure to announce that my home page, which debuted way back in the early 1990s, has also been born again, with its own domain name: https://chrismatthewsciabarra.com.

The “new” Notablog is not quite a blank slate. It does include a monthly index to the 3,058 entries that I wrote between 26 July 2002 through 26 July 2020. That index can be found here.

The home page has not changed much, though a link to my Facebook profile is now included. But if you check around the site — which has not yet received any face-lift — you’ll find much more content, especially in the Essays section, which now includes links to over 150 essays.

These moves were necessary, given that New York University, which so generously provided me with space on its i4 server for nearly thirty years, is finally retiring that ancient server. My thanks especially to Jodi Goldberg for all her support and to Lec Maj and the NYU Web Team as well.

But it was time to make that move [YouTube link… you didn’t think you were going to escape one of those music links, did you? The more things change … 🙂 ].

I want to thank, especially, my dear friend Peter Saint-Andre, for his work, guidance, and support, throughout this period of transition. I couldn’t have done it without him (and a few dozen calls to Tech Support folks with regard to domain and hosting services)!

Just one reminder to folks about the name “Notablog.” As I stated way back on 15 February 2005:

“Some readers have wondered why I continue to call this site ‘Not a Blog,’ even though it seems to become more blog-like with each passing week. Well, it’s going to stay ‘Not a Blog’—though from now on it will appear with closed spaces between the words: ‘Notablog.’ That phrase can just as easily be viewed as an acronym for ‘None Of The Above Blog’ … or ‘Nota Blog’ … recalling the Latin phrase ‘Nota Bene,’ featuring entries on topics of which one might take particular notice.”

Either way, I’m breathing a great sigh of relief that this project is finally Ready for Prime Time. The content will grow on this new incarnation of Notablog, even as you’ll still have access to all the entries and comments from years past.

Enjoy!

Song of the Day #1801

Song of the DayThe Time is Now [YouTube link] was composed by jazz pianist David Hazeltine, who performs it with bassist Ron Carter and drummer Al Foster as the title track to his 2019 album. Enjoy this trio of ol’ pros; they are so in sync with one another.

Olivia de Havilland, RIP

On July 1, I noted that Olivia de Havilland had reached 104 years of age.

Today, Olivia has died—one of the few remaining stars from Hollywood’s Golden Age.

As I noted on the first of the month: “From her films with the great swashbuckler Errol Flynn to her Oscar-winning turns in ‘To Each His Own’ and ‘The Heiress,’ she has provided us with quite a film legacy.”

Olivia, RIP