Song of the Day #1845

Song of the Day: Dear Heart (“Main Theme”), music by Henry Mancini, lyrics by Ray Evans and Jay Livingston, is from the 1964 film of the same name, starring Glenn Ford and Geraldine Page.  This Oscar-nominated song is ever-so-appropriate for Valentine’s Day. But I also dedicate it to my sweetheart friend, Mimi Reisel Gladstein, who celebrates her birthday today, and who has been calling me her “dear heart” practically from the beginning of our friendship in the 1990s. A happy and a healthy birthday, dearest Mimi! And a Happy Valentine’s Day to all who love. Check out the original recording and renditions by Andy Williams, Frank Sinatra, Jack Jones, Al Martino, and Bobby Vinton [YouTube links].

Better Call My Cousin Vinny

I don’t care what your political persuasion is; the reference to one of my all-time favorite comedies gave me a chuckle. Where’s My Cousin Vinny and Mona Lisa Vito when you need them?

Courtesy of Bramhall’s World (New York Daily News, Feb.11, 2021)

JARS: The Benefits of the Collective!

Last Friday, I announced that The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies celebrated its twentieth anniversary with an astounding 22,209 global article requests from JSTOR and Project Muse (not counting print subscriptions). As it happens, though Project Muse will continue offering current issues as part of its program, JSTOR will be ending its policy of offering current journal issues by December 31, 2021. What does this mean for the JARS e-subscriber?

Well, all electronic subscribers to the journal will continue to have access to what will be 21 years of JARS back issues through the JSTOR platform. According to JSTOR, back issues will continue to be accessible as the “moving wall advances each year.” So where will new issues of JARS be published starting in 2022?

The Scholarly Publishing Collective, that’s where! From a February 9, 2021 press release comes this news:

Duke University Press is pleased to partner with nonprofit scholarly journal publishers and societies to provide journal services including subscription management, fulfillment, hosting, and institutional marketing and sales in a collaboration called the Scholarly Publishing Collective (SPC).


Beginning in 2021, the SPC will provide subscription management and fulfillment services, in partnership with Longleaf Services, to Cornell University Press, Texas Tech University Press, and the University of North Carolina Press. The SPC online content platform will launch in 2022, hosting journals and fulfilling digital access on behalf of Michigan State University Press, Penn State University Press, the Society of Biblical Literature, and the University of Illinois Press.

“Finding a powerful hosting platform for our eighty scholarly journals, as well as securing the expert sales and marketing services of the SPC, will transport our journals to new levels of impact,” said Patrick Alexander, director of Penn State University Press. “We’re thrilled about offering enhanced services to our societies, journal editors, and libraries, and we are eager to work with colleagues at Duke University Press, one of the most talented teams in university press publishing.”


Through the SPC, publishers will have access to resources that would otherwise be cost-prohibitive, such as a best-in-class web platform, proven customer relations and library relations teams, and a network of global sales agents with insight into university press content.

“We are honored to be working with this prestigious group of publishers,” said Duke University Press director Dean Smith. “The SPC gives us an opportunity to support a healthy ecosystem for nonprofit, mission-driven publishing and to help ensure that these publications and organizations remain vital to the communities they serve.”

More information will be forthcoming to JARS subscribers, but the expansion of the journal’s global visibility, accessibility, and scholarly impact can only be enhanced by this new endeavor.

Our July 2021 issue will be submitted to the press in a few weeks!

Song of the Day #1843

Song of the Day: The Russia House (“Soundtrack Suite”), composed by Jerry Goldsmith, ends our four-day salute (within our Film Music February tribute) to one of the greats of the “art of the score.” This suite derives from the 1990 film based on the novel by John Le Carre (who died in December 2020), starring Sean Connery (who died in October 2020). Back in 2008, I highlighted the soaring love theme to this film (“Alone in the World” [mp3]—delivered with perfection by my sister-in-law, Joanne Barry, accompanied by jazz guitarists Jack Wilkins and my bro, Carl Barry). Interestingly, the main theme owed its origins to earlier work that Goldsmith had done for “Wall Street” (1987) and then, for “Alien Nation” (1988)—both times, rejected! This profoundly moving jazz-infused score, which features the virtuoso saxophonist Branford Marsalis throughout, is a testament to Goldsmith’s genius.

Chick Corea, RIP

Sad news of the deaths of Hal Holbrook, Christopher Plummer, and Mary Wilson came over the past week or two. But tonight’s news was truly devastating for this long-time fan of one of the greatest musicians in the history of jazz: Chick Corea, who passed away on Tuesday at the age of 79.

I am without words. There are so many of his compositions that have graced “My Favorite Songs” throughout the years that I would not know where to begin in celebrating his legacy. Winner of 23 Grammy Awards, a master improviser and innovator, whether in acoustic or electric settings, playing standards or original fusion compositions, which defied categorization (encompassing jazz, rock, and classical influences), Chick was among the most important pianists of his generation.

I saw him in concert, a joyful tribute to his terrific 1978 album, “The Mad Hatter” (along with Herbie Hancock, Joe Farrell, Gary Burton, Eddie Gomez, Steve Gadd, Gayle Moran, and an orchestra). Check out that album, starting here [on YouTube].

RIP, Chick.

Song of the Day #1842

Song of the Day: Poltergeist (“Soundtrack Suite”) [YouTube link], composed by Jerry Goldsmith, continues our four-day salute to this great film score maestro. This suite, derived from his 1982 Oscar-nominated score to one of the best supernatural horror films, shows the enormous breadth of moods and motifs that Goldsmith typically delivered. The score lost out to one of the great triumphs of John Williams’s career (“E.T. the Extra Terrestrial“), but it’s with a little irony that it arose out of a collaboration with the director of that other film: Steven Spielberg.

Song of the Day #1841

Song of the Day: Gremlins 2 (“Soundtrack Suite”) [YouTube link] was composed by Jerry Goldsmith, who was born on this date in 1929. Having composed the score to the original “Gremlins” (1984), he returned in 1990 to compose the score to its sequel, “Gremlins 2: The New Batch.” Opening with a bow to that classic “Merrie Melodies” cartoon theme [YouTube link], this soundtrack suite captures a “new batch” of cues, some macabre, some comedic, all perfectly integrated.

Song of the Day #1840

Song of the Day: Gremlins 1 (“Soundtrack Suite”) [YouTube link], composed by the late Jerry Goldsmith, features highlights from this 1984 comedy-horror hybrid. It embodies elements of both genres. Today begins a four-day celebration of the wonderful Goldsmith and his artistry. He has composed some of my all-time favorite scores, from “Alien,” “The Omen,” and “Planet of the Apes” to “Chinatown” and “L.A. Confidential.” Tomorrow marks the 92nd anniversary of Goldsmith’s birth.