Daily Archives: November 14, 2021

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JARS: New December 2021 Issue is a Blockbuster!

The December 2021 issue of The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies (Volume 21, Number 2) is in production and it’s a blockbuster!

First and foremost, the issue is dedicated to the memory of Advisory Board member and JARS contributor, the late Steven Horwitz. It also introduces four new Advisory Board members: Laurence I. Gould, Kirsti Minsaas, Aeon J. Skoble, and Edward W. Younkins — as well as a new Associate Editor: Roger E. Bissell.

And as we have done with every issue that we’ve ever published, we introduce at least one new contributor to the JARS family. This time, it’s two new contributors: Winton Bates and Pavel Solovyev, with whom I’ve coauthored the lead essay. Here’s our line-up:

Introduction: Dedicating — and Rededicating – Chris Matthew Sciabarra

The Rand Transcript Revealed – Chris Matthew Sciabarra and Pavel Solovyev

The Lady and the Stamp – Amos Wollen

Reviews

Flourishing in a Risky World – Winton Bates (a review of Freedom, Eudaemonia, and Risk, by Kathleen Touchstone)

The First Russian Biography of Ayn Rand – Anastasiya Vasilievna Grigorovskaya (a review of Ayn Rand, by Ludmila L. Nikiforova and Mikhail B. Kizilov)

Hunting the Pseudo-Philosopher: Perils and Pitfalls – Roderick T. Long (a review of False Wisdom, by Gary H. Merrill)

Check the JARS site for article abstracts and contributor biographies!

I am going to have a lot more to say about the coauthored lead essay, “The Rand Transcript Revealed” in the coming days and weeks. One of its sparkling characteristics is the first-ever publication of 28 images of original archival documents (in color for all electronic formats of the journal; rendered in black and white for our print version).

For now, let me just extend my deepest appreciation to our readers as we complete our twenty-first volume. We remain the only scholarly, double-blind peer-reviewed, biannual, interdisciplinary, university-press published periodical devoted to the study of Ayn Rand and her times.

Folks can subscribe to the journal here.

The December 2021 Issue of The Journal of Ayn Rand Studies

Uncle Nick, Godfather: RIP

On Thursday, November 11, 2021, my Uncle Nick Michalopoulos died at the age of 91, after several years of battling serious health issues. He was my mother’s brother.

My relationship with Uncle Nick was blessed quite literally from the very beginning. As my godfather, he held me in his arms when I was baptized on June 11, 1961 at the Three Hierarchs Church in Brooklyn (the church whose first pastor was my grandfather, Vasilios P. Michalopoulos, and my mom was his sister).

Born on June 14, 1930, Uncle Nick would go on to serve in the medical unit of the Navy during the Korean War. Thereafter, he worked thirty years at Western Electric. He was the only one of eight siblings to go on to attend college—Brooklyn College, to be precise. (My sister would follow in his footsteps, becoming the first in our extended family to graduate from Brooklyn College some years later.)

Throughout his life, Uncle Nick exhibited a remarkable range of wonderful talents—from singing to athletics, crafts to parenting. Indeed, he and my godmother, Aunt Vina, raised three children—my first cousins—to whom they have passed on their loving gifts: Will, Marie, and Christine. Add to that seven grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren. In his retirement years, Uncle Nick enjoyed golfing and traveling, and was very handy, even crafting golf clubs and pitching-in with the church here in Brooklyn and out on Long Island, a testament to his strong Greek Orthodox faith.

Over the years, as I truly got to know my godfather, I saw that he had a sweet sense of life and a wonderfully dry sense of humor. Because he lived out on the island, we didn’t see each other as much as we would have liked, but we spoke regularly. I never missed a birthday, a holiday, or a Father’s Day wish.

I am deeply saddened by his passing. And I will carry his love in my heart forever. Rest in Peace, Uncle Nick.

Aunt Vina (l) and Uncle Nick (r)