Song of the Day #1958

Song of the Day: Cherry Pie, words and music by Jani Lane, was a Top Ten Hot 100 Hit for the glam metal rock band, Warrant—the title single to their 1990 album. It’s considered a “hair metal” anthem. The video received heavy airplay on MTV (remember when they used to show music videos?). Check it out on YouTube.

Major League Sportsmanship from the Little Leaguers

After the batter was hit by a pitch and takes first base, he comforts the pitcher… who is so obviously shaken up. Now granted, this wasn’t a purposeful drilling. But I can think of a few major league ballplayers who can take lessons from the kids on great sportsmanship.

Check out more on this story here.

40 Years Later: 1982 Films Still Having an Impact

Check out this NY Times article, “Five Sci-Fi Classics, One Summer: How 1982 Shaped Our Present.” This is a really interesting read on 5 films from 1982 that are still having an impact on the sci-fi genre 40 years later: “ET, The Extra-Terrestrial,” “Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan,” “Blade Runner,” “Tron,” and John Carpenter’s “The Thing“.

Also see the discussion on Facebook.

Song of the Day #1957

Song of the Day: I’ll Be with You in Apple Blossom Time was written in 1920 by Albert Von Tilzer and Neville Fleeson. It was first recorded as a waltz by Nora Bayes. It was later covered by such artists as Artie Shaw (vocals by Tony Pastor) and Harry James and Helen Forest [YouTube links]. But it is most well known for having been performed by The Andrews Sisters, whose version was featured in the 1941 Abbott and Costello film, “Buck Privates.” Check out the film clip and studio version [YouTube links].

Vin Scully, RIP

A great baseball broadcaster, Vin Scully (1927-2022), has died at the age of 94. Check out retrospectives on the life of the man who started broadcasting for the Dodgers back in 1950, when they were still in Brooklyn! 67 seasons, not only as the Voice of the Dodgers but of so many memorable moments in baseball history …

In the NY Times here and here, ESPN, Sports Illustrated, and MLB. It was actually through the NY Yankees that I learned of Scully’s passsing late last night; they put up a loving tribute to him. Also: check out Mike Lupica’s tribute.

Vin Scully (from Wikipedia)

Song of the Day #1956

Song of the Day: A Taste of Honey, words and music by Bobby Scott and Ric Marlow, was first heard in the 1960 Broadway version of the British play of the same name. A 1965 version by Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass [YouTube link] would go on to score four Grammy Awards, including Record of the Year. Other notable instrumental versions of the song were recorded by Paul Desmond & Jim Hall, Harry James, Jackie Gleason, Chet Atkins, The Ventures, and Emily Remler [YouTube links]. The first vocal versions were recorded by Billy Dee Williams in 1961 and Lenny Welch in 1962, followed by renditions by The Beatles and Barbra Streisand [YouTube links]. But today’s featured rendition is by the legendary Tony Bennett [YouTube link], who celebrates his 96th birthday.

Song of the Day #1955

Song of the Day: One Bad Apple features the words and music of George Jackson, who originally wrote it for The Jackson 5 (no relation). By the end of 1970, the J5 had scored 4 consecutive #1 Hot 100 hits. This song was released in November of that year by The Osmonds, who took this track to #1 for five weeks on the Hot 100 and #6 on the R&B Chart. The Jacksons and the Osmonds would meet in 1971-1972, and Donny Osmond and Michael Jackson would become lifelong friends. Check out this video version of the single [YouTube link], which combines performance footage and clips from “The Osmonds” animated ABC-TV series. (Yes, “The Jackson 5ive” had an animated show too!)

Notablog: 20 Years, 3500 Posts

On July 26, 2002, I posted my first Notablog entry. It was to announce the New York Daily News publication on that date of my essay, “From The Fountainhead: Howard Roark“, part of the newspaper’s series, “Big Town Classic Characters: New Yorkers of the American Imagination.”

Today marks the twentieth anniversary of that first post. And this just so happens to be my 3,500th blog post in two decades. And if you believe this is a total coincidence, I got a nice bridge in Brooklyn I can sell you!

I started posting on Notablog when it was on the NYU server (archives of all those posts, July 26, 2002 to August 1, 2020 can be found here). On August 1, 2020, I migrated to my own Notablog.net.

Speaking of dates, it was back on May 14, 2022 that my long-time friend Roger Bissell said, tongue-in-cheek, “Chris himself has a long-running internet presence he styles in delightfully quasi-Hegelian fashion as ‘Notablog’.” Though I clearly have my quasi-Hegelian tendencies, I have indeed long been asked why I call what is obviously a blog, “Notablog”. As I explained on February 15, 2005:

Some readers have wondered why I continue to call this site “Not a Blog,” even though it seems to become more blog-like with each passing week. Well, it’s going to stay “Not a Blog”—though from now on it will appear with closed spaces between the words: “Notablog.” That phrase can just as easily be viewed as an acronym for “None Of The Above Blog” (as suggested here) or “Nota Blog” (as suggested here), recalling the Latin phrase “Nota Bene,” featuring entries on topics of which one might take particular notice.  

In any event, I’m happy that I’ve not let up in twenty years. I hope to continue blogging for a long time to come, and to continue sharing some of the blog’s contents on Facebook as well!

Postscript: Discussion of this post can be found on Facebook. Also: Much thanks to Tom Knapp for his kind congrats!

Song of the Day #1954

Song of the Day: Strawberry Fields Forever is considered part of the Lennon-McCartney Songbook, but John Lennon was its composer. In the wake of his tragic death, a section of New York City’s Central Park was declared Strawberry Fields, where his ashes were scattered by Yoko Ono in 1981. The song, recorded by The Beatles, was released as a double-A side single (along with “Penny Lane“) in 1967. It had a huge impact on the development of the emerging psychedlic genre and is credited as a pioneering work in music video. Check out that video, as well as a really cool jazzy rendition by the Nick Grondin Group and a Latin-tinged rendition by vocalist Karen Souza [YouTube links].

Dexter the Dog

Dexter the Dog … an inspiration, from Ouray, Colorado (the place that inspired Galt’s Gulch in Ayn Rand‘s Atlas Shrugged) …